New Book Announcement, and I Need YOUR Help

RUSH fans

I’m pleased to announce that I am going to be writing my first non-fiction book. That’s right: Like I alluded to on David V. Stewart’s stream a few days ago, I am going to pen a book about one of my favorite rock bands of all-time, Rush.

This should come as no surprise to anyone who has read this blog lately. The death of Rush drummer and lyricist Neil Peart in early January affected a lot of us fans more deeply than the death of any celebrity we’ve never met in person, and who doesn’t even know we exist, should.

The purpose of this book, with the working title of Dreamers and Misfits, is to explore what it is about the band that means so much to us fans, and to also offer a, hopefully, comprehensive profile of what a “typical” Rush fan is.

Until fairly recently, Rush was considered a “nerd” band, only liked by nerds and losers who were typically smelly white male dorks who played Dungeons and Dragons and never kissed girls. All the cool kids listened to Elvis Costello or whatever. Plus, the singer totally sounds like a girl.

Image result for rush fans"

All that is, of course, balderdash, but there are commonalities among a lot of Rush fans: Rush is kind of a “guy” band, lots of Rush fans are into what are considered nerdier pursuits (just like the band was!), and a whole lot are musicians themselves.

More than that, us Rush fans seem to be really into the band. Not just an album or a song here and there, but their entire catalog. Ever been to a Rush concert? Every one is like a party. Though fans have heard the songs a million times before, every time Geddy, Alex, and Neil launched into another song, we’d all freak out: “Ahhh oh my God I can’t believe they’re playing this!” I still get the same feeling listening to one of their live albums.

Image result for jason segel rush"
There are far more celebrity Rush fans than these two . . .

Anyway, this project is supposed to be fun. Sign up for my mailing list here for the details. What I need from you, the fan, is to answer a survey. I’m not going to post it here because it’s much easier for me to email everyone and get the responses in my inbox.

I’m not starting another mailing list and inbox, because ain’t nobody got time for that. And no, this isn’t just a cheap ploy to get more mailing list subscribers. That’s just a happy side-effect.

This book is going to be a celebration of the band, and the fan. It is not going to be yet another biography of the three Canuck musicians we all love. It’s going to be a biography of you, the Rush fan, playing air drums on your steering wheel during the middle part of “Tom Sawyer,” wailing away like Geddy Lee as you belt out “Freewill,” and getting the chills during the guitar solo of “Limelight.”

This isn’t going to supplant my fiction writing. It’s going to complement it.


Speaking of my fiction, you’ll love my latest The Last Ancestorclassic coming-of-age sword-and-planet crossed with Thundercats, 80s action, and plenty of freaky aliens–as well as my debut A Traitor to Dreams–female-fronted weird-fiction isekai urban fantasy with a talking bird. Help support my work while I get started on this Rush book!

A Traitor to Dreams Alexander Hellene
Buy on Amazon
The Last Ancestor Alexander Hellene
Buy on Amazon

12 comments

  1. Alexander

    As a casual fan, I greatly appreciated the lyrics. They were well thought out giving their perspective on life and stuff.
    Of course I disagreed here and there but I still admired their forthrightness.

    In a way they were troubadors.

    The other was the music. It was composed with the same care and quality as classical music.

    Proof that popular music is as sophisticated and worthy as court music.

    xavier

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, depending on WHO it is, pop/rock can be pretty sophisticated. Of course, a band like Rush is typically an exception, although progressive rock is generally a cut above the rest in a lot of respects.

      I hear good things about Porcupine Tree, as far as modern prog goes. Dream Theater is another good one if you’re into more classic metal styles.

      Like

  2. Alex wrote: “This book is going to be a celebration of the band, and the fan. It is not going to be yet another biography of the three Canuck musicians we all love. It’s going to be a biography of you, the Rush fan, playing air drums on your steering wheel during the middle part of “Tom Sawyer,” wailing away like Geddy Lee as you belt out “Freewill,” and getting the chills during the guitar solo of “Limelight.”

    —-Sounds like a fun idea! Your enthusiasm for it is evident through the screen. And I like how you are tackling the subject from a different direction, I’m sure you’ll get the “nerd” stories but probably some interesting ones from less expected fans and the women fans too. Anyway, I hope this works well for you. Good luck!

    cheers

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you! I have some exciting stuff lined up for this book that I don’t want to talk about now, but can’t wait to reveal when the time is right!

      I would just like some more people signing up to get the survey though…ah well.

      Like

  3. “More than that, us Rush fans seem to be really into the band. Not just an album or a song here and there, but their entire catalog. Ever been to a Rush concert? Every one is like a party.”

    I am a big Rush fan who owns all their albums and listens to them often, but the role Rush concert I ever got to attend (before leaving the USA for a country where they never toured) wasn’t like that at all. I went to a Vapor Trails-era show expecting everyone to be like me or my Rush-superfan dad, but many of the people around me were relatively uninvolved in the show until Tom Sawyer came on late in the concert. Only then did they seem delighted, finally hearing the material that they knew so well from FM radio. It puzzled me that people would spend so much money on expensive tickets to a band that they weren’t all that into.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Huh! That’s wild and very different than my experience has been. I wonder why the show you went ti was like that?

      When I saw them in 2002, they played Tom Sawyer first. And I didn’t see any lag in crowd enthusiasm afterwards.

      That’s a very interesting observation. I wonder how many other shows have been like that? For such a “cult band” like Rush, the assumption isn’t that concertgoers are REALLY into the entirety of the band’s catalogue, or close too it. But we know what they say about assumptions.

      Great anecdote and thanks for the comment!

      Like

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