No Nice Things

Boycotts and coffee and anger oh my!

For starters, let me say that (1) I fully support boycotts, because people can do whatever the hell they want, (2) it’s nigh impossible to make “voting with your dollar” have any impact if there aren’t enough dollars involved, and (3) your pious market-worshipping friend who can’t stop pleasuring him- or herself to Kirk’s ten principles can cram their bowtie up their rear end as they whine about “stooping to their tactics.”

Don’t you get it? Croaking “muh principles!” as your side–whatever your side may be–continuously loses while you righteously complain is worse than useless.

People who hate you and everything you stand for tend not to respond to self-satisfied virtue, no matter how forcefully asserted. In fact, your principles make them dig in even further. People respond best to pain. And I’m a civilized society, economic pain is far more preferable to physical pain.

This is why we “can’t have nice things,” as the cliche goes. This is also why I am a full proponent of retaliating in kind. Every single side in this sick, sad country will not learn until we’re all poorer, more unhappy, and less-willing to share what we think.

Yes, this means things will get worse before they get better. Boo hoo. The world is not a perfect place. Deal with it.

Continue reading “No Nice Things”

We Are All Frauds

Hypocrisy mask

Authenticity is an elusive concept. We all want to be “true to ourselves.” But this first requires that we know who we are.

There’s also an important, overlooked second part, and that is this: authenticity lies in acting in accordance with who we are, or at the very least, how we wish we could be.

In his excellent guest post here, Avtomat Khan of Hidden Dominion discussed the idea of sharing who you are and what you think, regardless of consequences, lest others control you via you putting undue emphasis on what they think of you.

Hmm . . . that sounds familiar. Almost like the title of a book I read recently. And like that book–Ed Latimore‘s Not Caring What Other People Think Is A Superpower–such an internal harmony is the best way to avoid charges of hypocrisy.

And remember: Hypocrisy isn’t bad only because other people will know you’re a fake or a fraud. It’s bad because you will know it too.

Authenticity Graph

I think about this because, as someone who blogs on the Internet, likes to write, and uses social media as a way to communicate, get a few laughs, learn, blow off steam, and even indulge in a little self-promotion, I wonder about the fact that somewhere there may be someone who actually takes what I say seriously.

This is both humbling and frightening. Humbling, because I like to think that I do have some wisdom worth sharing, and frightening, because who the hell am II’m just some dope with a WordPress account.

And worst of all, for my own sense of cognitive well-being, I don’t share everything with all of you. So how can you know if I’m authentic or not? And I don’t act the way I want and just let the chips fall where they may. If I did that, I probably wouldn’t have a wife, or a job, or friends . . .

So am I really true to myself? Continue reading “We Are All Frauds”

Weaponized Sanctimony: What to Make of the Piety Police (and How Not to Join Them)

There’s a pretty famous saying that goes “Judge not, that ye be not judged.” You’ve probably heard of it.

You probably also think it means that you should accept everything that everyone, everywhere does without so much as a thought of disapprobation.

But there’s more to it. As with most things, context is key:

Judge not, that ye be not judged.

For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.

And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?

Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye; and, behold, a beam is in thine own eye?

Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother’s eye.

So besides the comical imagery of a guy walking around with a gigantic beam of wood sticking out of his eye, the takeaway here is a warning against hypocrisy: don’t accuse others of doing what you yourself do.

I think about this when I pay attention to current events. I don’t write about politics here unless it’s in a big-picture, conceptual way, mainly because (1) there are plenty of political blogs out there, and this isn’t one of them; (2) politics is actually really boring; (3) I talk about it enough on Twitter and Gab to get it out of my system, and (4) I don’t want to alienate any readers who might otherwise want to hear what I have to say.

But the media in this country, which has been derelict in its duty to both inform and hold the government accountable, continues to sink to new lows, and the lesson of the day is one in abject hypocrisy.

I don’t care who you’re voting for, but the furor over dirty words spoken about a certain candidate before their presidential run is both hilarious and astounding. I’m not talking about valid concerns that such words raise–it’s important to know everything about a potential president. I’m talking about the media’s hyperventilating over them.

These same people who, whether it’s in news, entertainment, or other areas of pop-culture, who push all kinds of lewdness, impiety, degeneracy (apologias for pedophilia, anyone?) are now incensed that somebody said rude words, and they expect us to take them seriously?

 

The same people who defend certain types of naughty words and behaviors actual actions towards members of a certain sex are now pretending to be the Church Lady from Saturday Night Live, and we’re supposed to believe they’re being sincere?

The same media establishment that, let’s be real, does not like religion, God, and particularly Christianity, is now appealing to our sense of morality about things?

Please. Continue reading “Weaponized Sanctimony: What to Make of the Piety Police (and How Not to Join Them)”