“What’cha thinkin’?”

“What’cha thinkin’?”

I hate this question. But I do not hate the people who ask it.

I know why people ask it: They want to start up a conversation. As someone who enjoys talking, I cannot fault them for this even a little bit.

But it’s a loaded question, similar to asking someone “How are you doing?” What they want really isn’t the question; they don’t care. “How are you doing?” has become conflated with “Hello!” And “What’cha thinkin’?” is more like “Let’s talk about something here; the silence is killing me!” Continue reading ““What’cha thinkin’?””

Chain Reactions: Affecting the People You’ve Never Met

chain-reaction

In this journey to understand the world and understand ourselves, we need to learn about mastery. Not necessarily mastery of a thing, although that is important, but mastery of ourselves.

I’m thinking about this lately as anger and emotion are ratcheted up in the United States, especially as I watch the first presidential debate.

There is nothing wrong with emotions. Emotions are information. However, the task is to make sure we do not let our emotions–our passions–control us.

In order to maintain this control, you need to look at why you may be feeling the way you are, and what you can do about it.

I thought about this at church yesterday, hearing my priest speak about the various people the Lord sends to us every day. Every person, he said, could be an opportunity for you to work God’s will, not just for you, but for other people.

I’ve written before about an obligation–maybe “obligation” is too strong a word and I should say “a strongly encouraged method of being”–to be cheerful, and treat everybody with respect and dignity. Commentor and fellow writer J-Wall Jackson pointed out that Jesus himself was a man of sorrow, and that we are not expressly command commanded to be cheerful, but hear me out, because it’s a great little trick to help you gain some control over your thoughts and your emotions (and also not be a jerk). Continue reading “Chain Reactions: Affecting the People You’ve Never Met”